The Wreckers, an 1856 poem

Here’s another shipwreck-themed poem culled from the archives. These four stanzas were published by Auburn, New York’s Cayuga Chief on July 8, 1856. It originally appeared in the Utica Teetotaler.

The Wreckers

A gallant ship was seen on the sea–

The sea was beating the breakers–

Her masts were split, her sails were torn;

And this was seen by the “wreckers”

*

‘Twas coming night when those brave hearts saw

That feeble ship on the ocean;

Each swore to save, and smote his breast

As proof of his devotion.

*

In darkness soon their craft was lost,

For night had spread her shadows,

And all that was seen was a phantom sail,

And all that was heard was the billows.

*

A long, long night ere morning came

Then slowly up the river

Floated the ship, with gallant crew,

But the wrecker was gone–was gone–forever.

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2 Comments

Filed under Dissertation Digest, Notes from the Field, Shipwreck culture, Shipwreck Kitsch

2 responses to “The Wreckers, an 1856 poem

  1. Off topic I know and maybe you’ve already seen it but for all its worth see this link:
    http://news.yahoo.com/ship-aground-off-italy-3-bodies-found-69-134340580.html

    Cruise ship ran aground in Italy. So far there are 3 dead and 69 missing.

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