More Ships, Shipwrecks, and Coastal History

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

So its taken a few more months than I thought to get back to Ships on the Shore. But what a few months it’s been! I’m happy to report that I recently began an appointment as a Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of History at the University of West Florida in lovely, lovely Pensacola. (This seems a wise place to note that Ships on the Shore remains my personal blog and, as such, does not reflect the opinions of my employer.) My temporary hiatus from higher ed—and this blog—has ended.

A lot has changed on this here internet since Ships on the Shore launched in 2011. For one thing, blogs seem to have become a bit passé. (Don’t ask me where I heard that, though, if pressed, I’d point to an episode of Fresh Air.) Still, working on this blog really helped me research, write, and actually finish my dissertation. I hope it works the same magic as I turn that dissertation into a proper book. The nature of posts will change – there will certainly be fewer and they’ll probably range a bit wider than before as I reframe, revise, and…submit my first manuscript. I’m also working on some really exciting “coastal” projects at UWF and have a few relevant side projects that I hope to share with you as they come together in the months ahead. I’m eager to see how Ships on the Shore develops.

If you’ve made it this far: thank you. Your comments, questions, suggestions, and “views” make work that is notoriously (some say perversely) isolating… social. Please read, comment, click around. Send me an email. Tweet a comment.  Forward a post. Tell me what I got wrong; what I missed; what I got right. I truly appreciate it all.

 

Some posts that are in the works:

-The coast, the beach, the littoral…are they different? Does it matter?

-Why are coasts so damn complicated?

-Maritime cultural landscapes, disasters, and frontiers—picking historiographical “fights”

-Relearning basic GIS: mapping historic census data with QGIS

-Digital serendipity, or, how the New Jersey Shipwreck Database found me

-quick reviews of recent reads

Advertisements

5 Comments

Filed under Notes from the Field

5 responses to “More Ships, Shipwrecks, and Coastal History

  1. Welcome back, Jamin. And congrats on your new position at the head of the class.
    I’m still working with The History Press.
    All the best,
    Tom Dresser

  2. ray wells

    Keep em coming!

  3. ahoy!! grats on the position and great to read your work!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s