Tag Archives: Shipwreck

Counting Wrecks: Visualizing T.A. Scott’s salvage work, 1879-1902

This summer I updated my database of T.A. Scott’s rescue and salvage work for the period between 1879 and 1902. After not thinking much about this data set for three years, I plunged back into historical newspaper databases (much expanded and improved in just a couple of years) and added more than 50 events to the database. I’m sure there are more Scott salvage jobs still hiding in obscure newspapers, but I’m feeling pretty confident I found the vast majority. All told, the database includes 247 separate rescue or salvage events. It’s not clear how many he personally supervised (contemporaries often seemed to conflate Scott the man with Scott the salvage company), but I think it safe to say he was personally involved in most. The database includes the month, year, type of vessel involved in the incident, the vessel’s name, the type of wreck (founding, stranding, ice, fire, damaged), and whether or not it was recovered or repaired. After cleaning up the database with OpenRefine, I used Excel and Tableau Public to create the initial visualizations below. I’m working up some fancier ways to display this data… look for those soon.

The first two graphs show the annual and seasonal variation in Scott’s salvage work. Marine salvage was anything but steady and the wide variation in salvage work belies just how important non-salvage activities must have been to the T.A. Scott Company. Winter and spring were his busiest salvage seasons. Summer activity was slower because there were fewer wrecks and because he focused resources on lucrative (and relatively steady) marine construction jobs. I want to plot Scott’s work against the number of reported incidents in eastern Long Island Sound to see if there is any correlation between number of wrecks/incidents and his salvage activity.

scott-wrecksperyearscott-wreckspermonth

Other trends emerge as we dig into the data. Most notably, the bulk of Scott’s salvage work involved stranded schooners. Steamers and barges were tied for a distant second and an eclectic mix 13 other vessel types took up the remainder. Second, we have large gaps in the data — we do not know, for example, the “type” of wreck for 67 incidents. Possibly with further research we’ll be able to fill in these blanks. (to explore the graphs click here and here.)

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More to come soon…

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Summer in New London: T.A. Scott and the New London Maritime Society

Fall is here; classes have begun. But I’m certainly not ready to give up summer, and so we’ll reminisce. Two months ago I gave a pair of talks at the New London Custom House for the New London Maritime Society. My time there got off to a fantastic start — lunch at Captain Scott’s Lobster Dock. Not only was the lobster roll divine (maybe I have been too south for too long), but I also met a direct descendant of Captain Thomas A. Scott, the Dock’s namesake and the topic of my first talk: Chasing Scott: Researching New London’s ‘Master Wrecker.’ There was a great turnout for a mid-week afternoon talk and an overwhelming interest in the man I’ve been researching for a long, long time. I think a biography would be great fun…

After making plans to connect with Scott’s heir during the New London off-season, I whiled away the afternoon in the Maritime Society’s wonderful archive. Susan Tamulevich, the director, was a wonderful host, and I look forward to going back and spending some serious research hours in their library. I also had the pleasure of meeting David Zapatka. Zapatka was taking down his amazing photography exhibit “Stars and Lighthouses”–a collection of wondrous non-Photoshopped images of lighthouses lit at night with stars in the background. I’ve looked at a whole lot of lighthouse photographs and I’ve never seen any like these.  Check them out — I’m saving up for a print.

The evening talk had another nice audience and a great discussion. I jabbered about my current book project, which I’m now tentatively calling Shipwrecks and the Making of the Modern Beach. The talk was an opportunity for me to take that difficult step back and try to give a coherent overview of the project. It was a difficult, but invaluable and has helped me immensely as I put together the book proposal.

In the next post, I’ll share some of the research and graphics I finished up this summer on the illustrious Captain Thomas A. Scott.

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More Ships, Shipwrecks, and Coastal History

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So its taken a few more months than I thought to get back to Ships on the Shore. But what a few months it’s been! I’m happy to report that I recently began an appointment as a Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of History at the University of West Florida in lovely, lovely Pensacola. (This seems a wise place to note that Ships on the Shore remains my personal blog and, as such, does not reflect the opinions of my employer.) My temporary hiatus from higher ed—and this blog—has ended.

A lot has changed on this here internet since Ships on the Shore launched in 2011. For one thing, blogs seem to have become a bit passé. (Don’t ask me where I heard that, though, if pressed, I’d point to an episode of Fresh Air.) Still, working on this blog really helped me research, write, and actually finish my dissertation. I hope it works the same magic as I turn that dissertation into a proper book. The nature of posts will change – there will certainly be fewer and they’ll probably range a bit wider than before as I reframe, revise, and…submit my first manuscript. I’m also working on some really exciting “coastal” projects at UWF and have a few relevant side projects that I hope to share with you as they come together in the months ahead. I’m eager to see how Ships on the Shore develops.

If you’ve made it this far: thank you. Your comments, questions, suggestions, and “views” make work that is notoriously (some say perversely) isolating… social. Please read, comment, click around. Send me an email. Tweet a comment.  Forward a post. Tell me what I got wrong; what I missed; what I got right. I truly appreciate it all.

 

Some posts that are in the works:

-The coast, the beach, the littoral…are they different? Does it matter?

-Why are coasts so damn complicated?

-Maritime cultural landscapes, disasters, and frontiers—picking historiographical “fights”

-Relearning basic GIS: mapping historic census data with QGIS

-Digital serendipity, or, how the New Jersey Shipwreck Database found me

-quick reviews of recent reads

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We’re Back! Shipwrecks, Coastal Landscapes, and “Watery Graves”

yAfter lying dormant for two years, Ships on the Shore is back!

I feel a little rusty coming out of the blocks but time has come to turn that dissertation I blabbered about for two years into a proper book. Ships on the Shore was central to successfully researching, writing, and defending my dissertation so I have high hopes that this blog and you dear reader will help me once again.

Ships on the Shore will document turning a concise dissertation into a publishable (fingers-crossed published) work of history. If you choose to follow us–and I hope you do–expect tales of shipwrecks past and present. Expect news of research finds big and small. Expect a little bit of grousing (if only because I have to work for a living now — long gone are those sweet fellowship-funded days). And expect–hopefully–a bit of celebrating as we complete the book and navigate the publishing process.

Please, please, please post comments or send me an email! Your thoughts, comments, insights, and suggestions are so much more helpful than I can express. If you like what you read, share Ships on the Shore with others. For those of you who sent a message since 2011 — I’ll be reaching out to you very soon. I’m truly looking forward to connecting.

But enough about me and you — let’s talk shipwreck.

The first wreck back had to be a good one and this 1835 shipwreck has it all — mystery, salvage, a snow storm, whale oil, and  “not a soul” escaping “a watery grave.”

xMelanchohly Wreck.–The schr. Herald at this port of Saturday, picked up, between Montaug and Point Judith, 5 casks of sperm oil, bearing the mark of the guager at Warren; the sloop Traveller also picked up one cask, and several other vessels, saw fragments of the wreck, a mattrass, and a part of the quarter deck of a vessel, between Watch Hill and Point Judith. About 1000 barrels of oil, of which this was supposed to be a part, was shipped last week at Warren, on board two sloops for New York. As they both left Newport on Tuesday last, it was impossible to judge which of them had been wrecked, until yesterday afternoon, when a gentleman arrived from Warren, and on inspecting the casks, unhesitatingly pronounced them the cargo of the sloop Eloisa, Capt. Smith, one of the above vessels. It is supposed she struck on Fisher’s Island Reef, during the snow storm on Wednesday night, and in all human probability, not a soul escaped a watery grave. -Providence Journal of Monday.”

Incidentally, it was wrecks like this that made New London, Connecticut a prime spot for salvage master T.A. Scott to set up shop in the 1870s. Scott was a remarkable character — for more start here.

~Article transcribed from the April 8, 1835 edition of the Barnstable Patriot is graciously made available by the lovely Sturgis Library located on Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

 

 

 

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Forgotten Wrecks: Schooner Sea Lion (1875)

Screenshot from 2013-03-04 09:24:41

Late winter/early spring was always a dangerous time for vessels as unsettled weather and frigid conditions contributed to dozens of shipwrecks. Today’s forgotten wreck brings us back to March 4, 1875, when the Boston Daily Journal printed:

Schooner Ashore

ROCKPORT, Mass, March 4. The schooner Sea Lion of Lockport, N.S. [Nova Scotia], Capt. McCanghev, from Clenfuagos for Portland, Me., loaded with molasses went ashore about 10:00 A.M. to-day, at Rockport. The crew were saved by the use of the mortar and life lines. If the storm abates the vessel and cargo may be saved.

The Sea Lion‘s wreck was one of a dozen wrecks reported in American newspapers on that days. Some involved loss of life, but the Sea Lion was representative of nineteenth century shipwrecks along the American coastline. Further particulars about the schooner surfaced over the next few days. According to the Boston Daily Journal of March 6th:

THE WRECK OF THE SCHOONER SEA LION. The schooner Sea Lion, from Cienfuegos for Portland, stranded on the beach at Rockport, Mass., reports having sighted land on the lee bow at 10 A.M. on Thursday during the storm, when an attempt was made to work her off shore, but it was soon made evident she would not go clear, and in order to save life and property, Captain McCanghey ran for the smoothest water and let go anchors, which failed to hold and the vessel was quickly driven ashore. All hands were rescued by means of the Massachusetts Humane Society’s Life Car. A line was thrown to the vessel by the mortar, by which a hawser was hauled to shore, and the life-car was transferred to the wreck and the mariners were pulled safely through the breakers to the land. From previous exposure the captain and crew suffered intensely from the cold and sleet. The captain’s hands were badly frost-bitten.

The survivors are desirous of expressing their heartfelt gratitude to the citizens of Rockport, who rescued them, and also to the Humane Society for their wise and generous act in placing life-saving apparatus at dangerous points along the coast. The wreck lies on a gravelly beach among many single rocks, on of which has been forced through her port bilge, breaking off her keelson and floor timbers. It is doubtful her hull will be worth saving. The cargo of molasses has been discharged and landed on the beach for shipment to its destination, under direction of Captain Moses B. Tower.

I haven’t been able to find any record of the Sea Lion‘s eventual fate, a typical ending for most shipwrecked vessels.

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